A movement to essentially take over the Facebook wall of cereal giant Kellogg’s appears to be working quite well, as a few peeks at the mega-corporation’s page reveals.

While the Battle Creek, Michigan based company has crafted a wholesome image through its commercials, friendly cartoon characters and seemingly health-focused products, activists of the GMO-free movement aren’t buying it because of their rampant use of GMOs, and they have a bone to pick.

Spurred by various activist groups for health freedom on Facebook including many that are support California’s landmark Proposition 37, which mandates genetically modified organism (from food crops) labeling, individual users have continued the barrage of posts. Most of them focus on their own personal decision to dump Kellogg’s for using GMOs in recent years, as well as to inform people interacting with the page about studies that have shown serious health defects caused by GMO corn and other GMOs.

Kellogg’s of course uses GMO’s in most of their cereals, as just about all processed food companies do nowadays. Corn, canola, soy, sugar beets (labeled as “sugar), and a few other ingredients are among those that are likely genetically modified if not organic. They have been linked to infertility, serious allergies, weight gain and organ damage in lab animals.

The company has taken a stand against Prop 37, however, to avoid having to label its products as containing GMOs in California. Many analysts believe that a win for the proposition in California could open the flood gates for more states to adopt such laws, which is exactly what companies like Kellogg’s and similar companies want to avoid. So far, Kellogg’s has contributed tens of thousands of dollars to fight the initiative and is likely to donate more as November draws near.

It’s interesting to note just how effective the campaign has been on Facebook by the anti-GMO crowd, however. Virtually every post or thread started by Kellogg’s has a high number of respondents spreading awareness about GMOs, and Kellogg’s fans are becoming curious. Many of them seem as if they had no idea that GMOs were even an issue, or that they happened to be in Kellogg’s products.

But with so many posts and comments on the Facebook page, it’s hard for Kellogg’s avoid the links and comments posted.

The company continues to disseminate the laughable idea that GMO labeling would be too costly somehow hurt the bottom lines of working families, but many of the GMO-free movement posters have taken to pointing out how hypocritical it is for Kellogg’s to create entire new box designs for the Olympics featuring athletes, as if it’s not costly to procure such sponsorships and/or to change their entire packaging.

Kellogg’s Facebook page may never be the same, as the activists show little sign of letting up. Perhaps this can be a future model as more and more companies invest in a stronger Facebook presence to reach fans.

Nicholas Tomasi is an AP-Award winning journalist and author turned health researcher. He currently runs AltHealthWORKS, a website dedicated to alternative medicine, organic food and the GMO-free movement.